Chemistry Syllabus

 

CHEMISTRY

COURSE SYLLABUS

 

Teacher: Royce Ohlde                                                           Home Phone (785)692-4349

 

Text: Introductory Chemistry, Zumdahl & DeCoste 2008

 

COURSE DESCRIPTION:

 

Chemistry is the study and investigation of the structure and properties of matter. We will use the lab exercises to better understand these structures and properties while also learning proper lab techniques.  Students taking this course should have a very good understanding of Algebra and be able to do calculations with confidence. 

 

I assume that the majority of the students taking Chemistry are considering attending a college after graduating from high school.  Therefore one of my goals for this class is to prepare you for college level work. With this in mind we will, at times, discuss things that may not be directly connected with Chemistry, but rather things that may help you be successful in college.

 

The material we will cover in the 36-week school year will usually be covered in about 14 weeks in a college General Chemistry course; they will also go into much more depth than we will here. At times you may feel we are covering a lot of material quickly, and we may be. Don’t give up.  YOU ARE CAPABLE OF MORE THAN YOU THINK.

 

 

The study of chemistry can be difficult and sometimes intimidating.  If you are confused or don’t understand something ASK FOR HELP.  I will be available before school (Linn) and after school (Hanover) if you need extra assistance.  Don’t be too scared or embarrassed to ask for help.  This can be a tough class; I will try to help you any way I can to make it easier.

 

All homework, notes, quizzes, lab reports, exams, and any other material distributed or returned by the teacher will be kept in a three ring binder.  You will be expected to have the notebook well organized and neat; bring it to class daily.  This is 10% of your grade, a little bit of effort will get you full credit.  Sloppiness can cost you a full letter grade.

 

 

 

 

 


 

  

The information covered in each chapter is given below.  The objective for every chapter is that students learn and understand this information.

 

Chapters 1 & 2:  

Chemistry an Overview

                    The Scientific Method

                    Units of Measure

                    Uncertainty in Measurement

                    Significant Figures and Calculations

                    Dimensional Analysis

                    Temperature

                    Density

 

Chapter 3:

                   Classification of Matter

                   Mixtures and pure substances

                   Heterogeneous and homogeneous mixtures

                   Elements and compounds

                   Physical and chemical properties

                   Physical and chemical changes

 

Chapter 4:           

The History of Chemistry

                     Fundamental Chemical Laws

                     Daltons Atomic Theory

                     Early Experiments to Characterize the Atom

                     The Modern View of Atomic Structure: An Introduction

                     Molecules, Isotopes and Ions

                     An Introduction to the Periodic Table

                                        

 

Chapter 5:

                   Nomenclature

                   Binary ionic compounds

                   Compounds with polyatomic ions

                   Nonmetal – nonmetal compounds

                   Acids


 

Chapter 6: 

                   Chemical reactions

                   Evidence of chemical reactions

                   Chemical equations

                   Balancing chemical equations

                  

Chapter 8:

                   Chemical composition  

                   Counting by weighing

                   Atomic mass

                   The mole

                   Molar mass

                   Percent composition of compounds

                   Formulas of compounds

                   Empirical and molecular formulas

 

Chapter 9: 

                   Chemical quantities

                   Mole – mole relationships

                   Mass calculations

                   Limiting reactants

                   Percent yield

 

Chapter 7:

                   Reactions in aqueous solutions

                   Predicting reactions

                   Precipitation reactions

                   Acid – base reactions

                   Oxidation – reduction reactions

                   Classification of reactions


 

Chapter 11:

                   Modern atomic theory

                   Rutherford’s atom

                   Quantum emissions

                   Bohr’s atomic model

                   Hydrogen orbitals

                   Electron configurations

                  

Chapter 15:

                   Solutions

                   Solubility

                   Solution composition, mass percent

                   Solution composition, molarity

                   Dilution

                   Stoichiometry of solution reactions

                   Neutralization reactions

 

Chapter 13:

                   Gases

                   Boyle’s law

                   Charles’s law

                   Avogadro’s law

                   Ideal gas law

                   Dalton’s law of partial pressures

                   Kinetic theory of gases

         

Chapter 12:

                   Chemical bonding

                   Types of bonds

                   Electronegativity

                   Bond polarity

                   Lewis structures

 

**Some chapters or sections of chapters may be added or deleted at the teacher’s discretion in order to maintain a proper time schedule.  This is a lot of material to cover in two semesters, but the more we cover the better the background you will have for college courses.  I will, however, try to maintain an appropriate pace so that you can learn the material well.

************************************************************************

 


Following are the assignments for each chapter, also listed are the state standards addressed in that chapter. In addition to the listed assignments the following labs, demonstrations, and activities will be incorporated into the appropriate chapters. 

 

Labs, Demonstrations, and Activities:

 

Penny drop activity

Measurement / sigfig activity

CO2 shower

Wine distillation

Sugar concentration lab

Electrolyte demonstration

Penny / average atomic mass lab

Blood donation demonstration

Sugar / H2SO4 demonstration

Exothermic / endothermic demonstration

Film canister activity

Precipitation lab

Percent yield lab

Emission spectra activity

Acid – base titration lab

Liquid nitrogen demonstration

Air pressure activity

 

Substitutions, additions, or deletions may be made to the listed assignments and activities to better meet the needs and abilities of the students.  Time constraints along with school activities and student attendance may also require some adjustments.


 

Assignments for Chapters 1&2

Chemistry: an Introduction and

Measurements and Calculations

Approximately 3 Weeks

 

Standards

Page 11: 1, 2, 6, 8, 10

 

Page 46: 3-8, 10-14

 

How Many Sigfigs #1

 

Page 48: 37, 41-43

 

Page 48: 5-55 Odd

 

Page 49: 59-69 Odd

 

Page 50: 77, 81, 85, 87, 91, 101, 105, 123, 125, 144

 

Complete Calculations

 

Indirect Measurement Lab

 

Chapters 1 & 2 Test

 

1.1.1

actively engages in asking and evaluating research questions

1.1.2

actively engages in investigations, including developing questions, gathering and analyzing data, and designing and conducting research

1.1.3

actively engages in using technological tools and mathematics in their own scientific investigations

1.1.4

actively engages in conducting an inquiry, formulating and revising his or her scientific explanations and models (physical, conceptual, or mathematical) using logic and evidence, and recognizing that potential alternative
explanations and models should be considered.

1.1.5

actively engages in communicating and defending the design, results, and conclusion of his/her investigation

7.1.2

explains how science uses peer review, replication
of methods, and norms of honesty

7.2.1

understands scientific knowledge describes and explains the physical world in terms of matter, energy, and forces. Scientific knowledge is provisional and is subject to change as new evidence becomes available

7.2.2

understands scientific knowledge begins with empirical observations, which are the data (also called facts or evidence) upon which further scientific knowledge is built.

7.2.3

understands scientific knowledge consists of
hypotheses, inferences, laws, and theories

7.2.4

understands a testable hypothesis or inference must be subject to confirmation by empirical evidence

 

 

Assignments for Chapter 3

Matter

Approximately 2 Weeks

 

Standards

Page 66: ALQ 1, 3, 5

Q&P 3, 7, 9, 11, 13, 17

 

Page 68: 19-35 Odd

 

Page 69: 37-57 Odd, 50, 54

 

Chapter 3 Test

 

2A.3.1

understands a chemical reaction occurs when one or more substances (reactants) react to form a different chemical substance(s) (products). There are different types of chemical reactions all of which demonstrate the Law of Conservation of Matter and Energy.

 

 

Assignments for Chapter 4

Chemical Foundations

Elements, Atoms, and Ions

Approximately 3 Weeks

 

Standards

Page 105: 3, 5, 9, 11, 13

 

Page 106: 15-27 Odd

 

Page 107: 29-41 Odd

 

Page 108:65-83 Odd

 

Quiz #5

 

Old Text Page 75: 33-51 Odd

 

Chapter 4 Test

 

Ion Quiz

 

2A.1.1

understands atoms, the fundamental organizational unit of matter, are composed of subatomic particles.

Chemists are primarily interested in the protons, electrons, and neutrons found in the atom.

2A.1.2

understands isotopes are atoms with the same atomic number (same number of protons) but different numbers of neutrons. The nuclei of some atoms are radioactive isotopes that spontaneously decay, releasing radioactive energy.

2A.2.2

understands the periodic table lists elements according to increasing atomic number. This table organizes physical and chemical trends by groups, periods, and sub-categories

 


 

Assignments for Chapter 5

Nomenclature

Approximately 2 Weeks

 

Standards

 

Page 133: 1, 3, 4, 5, 8, 9, 10-16

 

Page 134: 17, 19, 21

 

Page 134: 23, 29, 33-39 Odd

 

Ion Quiz #2

 

Name to Formula Wks.

 

Page 135: 41-51 Odd

 

Chapter 5 Test

 

2A.2.3

understands chemical bonds result when valence electrons are transferred or shared between atoms. Breaking a chemical bond requires energy. Formation of a chemical bond releases energy. Ionic compounds result from atoms transferring electrons. Molecular compounds result from atoms sharing electrons. For example, carbon atoms can bond to each other in chains, rings, and branching networks. Branched network and metallic solids also result from bonding.

 

 


 

Assignments for Chapter 6

Chemical Reaction: an Introduction

Approximately 2 Weeks

 

Standards

Page 157: 1-11 Odd

 

Page 159: 37&38

 

Page 159: 39-43

 

Balancing Quiz

 

Page 160: 45-55 Odd

 

Balancing Wks

 

Chapter 6 Test (Balancing)

 

2A.2.3

understands chemical bonds result when valence electrons are transferred or shared between atoms. Breaking a chemical bond requires energy. Formation of a chemical bond releases energy. Ionic compounds result from atoms transferring electrons. Molecular compounds result from atoms sharing electrons. For example, carbon atoms can bond to each other in chains, rings, and branching networks. Branched network and metallic solids also result from bonding.

2A.3.1

understands a chemical reaction occurs when one or more substances (reactants) react to form a different G9chemical substance(s) (products). There are different types of chemical reactions all of which demonstrate the Law of Conservation of Matter and Energy.

2A.3.2

understands how to perform mathematical calculations regarding the Law of Conservation of Matter, i.e., through stoichiometric relationships

 


 

Assignments for Chapter 8

Chemical Composition

Approximately 3-4 Weeks

 

Standards

Let’s Make Some Cookies

 

Page 230: 3-23 Odd

 

Page 231: 25-31 Odd

 

Page 232: 33-39 Odd

 

Molar Mass Quiz

 

Page 233: 45-51 Odd

 

Page 234: 55-73 Odd

 

Page 234: 75-81 Odd, 107, 111, 119 a-d, 121-125 Odd

 

Chapter 8 Test (Molar Mass, Empirical Formula & Molecular Formula Test)

 

2A.3.1

understands a chemical reaction occurs when one or more substances (reactants) react to form a different chemical substance(s) (products). There are different types of chemical reactions all of which demonstrate the Law of Conservation of Matter and Energy.

2A.3.2

understands how to perform mathematical calculations regarding the Law of Conservation of Matter, i.e., through stoichiometric relationships

 

Assignments for Chapter 9

Chemical Quantities

Approximately 2 Weeks

 

Standards

Page 260: 3-15 Odd

Page 261: 17-27 Odd

Page 272: 27-39 Odd

Page 262: 41-47 Odd

Page264: 51,53,61,62,66,89

Page 266: 78,84,86,88,89

 

Chapter 9 Test (Stoichiometry)

 

2A.3.2

understands how to perform mathematical calculations regarding the Law of Conservation of Matter, i.e., through stoichiometric relationships

 

 

 

Assignments for Chapter 7

Reactions in Aqueous Solutions

Approximately 3 Weeks

 

Standards

Page 193: 3-15 Odd

 

Page 194: 17-27 Odd

 

Precipitation Lab

 

Page 195: 31-39 Odd

 

Page 196: 41-67 Odd

 

Page 197: 69 a,d,f, 73 a-d, 75 a-d, 81, 83, 89, 91, 92

 

Chapter 7 Test

 

2A.2.3

understands chemical bonds result when valence electrons are transferred or shared between atoms. Breaking a chemical bond requires energy. Formation of a chemical bond releases energy. Ionic compounds result from atoms transferring electrons. Molecular compounds result from atoms sharing electrons. For example, carbon atoms can bond to each other in chains, rings, and branching networks. Branched network and metallic solids also result from bonding.

2A.3.1

understands a chemical reaction occurs when one or more substances (reactants) react to form a different chemical substance(s) (products). There are different types of chemical reactions all of which demonstrate the Law of Conservation of Matter and Energy.

2A.3.2

understands how to perform mathematical calculations regarding the Law of Conservation of Matter, i.e., through stoichiometric relationships

 


 

Assignments for Chapter 11

Modern Atomic Theory

Approximately 2 Weeks

 

Standards

Page 333: 1-10

 

Page 335: 45-55

 

Merril Chem Page 133: 39-43, 46

 

Page 338: 69, 75, 79, 81, 83, 87, 91, 97, 99, 110, 118

 

Chapter 11 Test (Atomic Theory)

 

2A.2.3

understands chemical bonds result when valence electrons are transferred or shared between atoms. Breaking a chemical bond requires energy. Formation of a chemical bond releases energy. Ionic compounds result from atoms transferring electrons. Molecular compounds result from atoms sharing electrons. For example, carbon atoms can bond to each other in chains, rings, and branching networks. Branched network and metallic solids also result from bonding.

2A.3.1

understands a chemical reaction occurs when one or more substances (reactants) react to form a different G9chemical substance(s) (products). There are different types of chemical reactions all of which demonstrate the Law of Conservation of Matter and Energy.

 

Assignments for Chapter 15

Solutions

Approximately 2 Weeks

 

Standards

Page 474: Q&P 5, 7, 9, 15-27

 

Page 475: 29-51 Odd

 

Page 477: 53- 61 Odd

 

Page 478: 63-69, 73, 74

 

Page 480: 102, 107, 111, 113, 115, 117, 122, 125-129

 

Chap 15 Test (Molarity)

 

2A.3.2

understands how to perform mathematical calculations regarding the Law of Conservation of Matter, i.e., through stoichiometric relationships

2A.3.3

understands the differences and reactions between acids, bases, and salts. Perform calculations to determine the concentration of ions in solutions.

 

 

Assignments for Chapter 13

Gases

Approximately 2 Weeks

 

Standards

Page 418: Q&P 7-23 Odd

 

Page 419: 29-43 Odd

 

Page 420: 49-63 Odd

 

Page 420: 67-71 Odd

 

Chapter 13 Test (Gas Laws)

 

2A.2.1

understands chemists use kinetic and potential energy to explain the physical and chemical properties of matter on earth that may exist in any of these three states: solids, liquids, and gases

2A.3.2

understands how to perform mathematical calculations regarding the Law of Conservation of Matter, i.e., through stoichiometric relationships

 

Assignments for Chapter 12

Chemical Bonding

Approximately 2 Weeks

 

Standards

Page 375: 1-5, 11-27 Odd, 39

 

Page 377: 45-59 Odd

 

Page 378: 63-67 Odd

 

Chapter 12 Test

 

 

 

 


Mr. Ohlde’s Classroom Rules

 

1.      Any homework, quiz, or test that is to be handed in should not be written in red, orange, or pink ink, any fringes from spiral bound notebooks need to be removed.

 

2.      The following information should be in the top right hand corner.

Name______________________

Date due____________________

Page no.____________________

 

3.      Use proper grammar and complete sentences on all written assignments.  Points will    be deducted if this rule is not followed.

 

4.      All students are expected to contribute in group projects and assignments, I will be watching for this.  If someone isn't doing his or her part please speak with me.

 

5.      Bring your text, notebook, calculator, paper, and pencil to every class.  If this becomes a problem you may start losing points.

 

6.      Don’t touch or mess with any material or equipment until I instruct you to.  During lab exercises we will sometimes be using materials that can cause permanent personal injury; horseplay or fooling around will not be tolerated.

 

7.      I know accidents happen, but if you break equipment due to carelessness you may be required to pay for replacing it.

 

8.      I am not a big fan of extra credit, if you want and need extra credit you will need to do extra work.  Extra credit will be something above and beyond the work we are doing in class, not just an extra worksheet or two.  Keep track of your scores so that you are aware of your present grade; ask me if you have any questions about how to calculate your grade.  By keeping track of your grade you can react early if it is lower than you like. 

9.   Anyone caught cheating on a quiz or test will receive a zero.  Just so everyone understands what I think constitutes cheating I will give several examples.  Using notes of any kind is cheating.  This includes information saved in the memory of calculators, written on paper, or on the tables; I will check for these.  Looking at another student’s paper is cheating, likewise carelessly or intentionally letting someone look at your paper is cheating.  If a student isn’t present when a test or quiz is given and needs to make it up at a later date it is cheating for any student to discuss items that are on the test with that student.  Talking between students during a test will be considered cheating.  If a situation arises that is not stated above Mr. Ohlde along with the school’s administrator will decide if it is cheating.

 

10.  Do not use cell phones in class, the school policy concerning cell phones will be         enforced in this class.  If a phone is being used for any purpose it will be turned in to the principal.

Late papers:

 

While I understand there will be times when turning in a late paper is unavoidable you need to understand the importance of turning in assignments in a timely manner.  Each student will be allowed three late papers without penalty, after that no credit will be given.  If you are going to be gone for a planned activity (school function, family outings, or hunting etc.) you are expected to turn in your homework before leaving.

 

 

 


Grading and Weighting:

 

Your grades will be divided into four categories, homework, quizzes, notebooks, and tests.  Since it is not unusual for students to work together on homework it is difficult to determine if the student turning in the homework completed and understands the homework.  I have no problem with students working together as long as one is not simply copying another student’s work.  For this reason the value of the score is reduced.  The value given for tests and quizzes is increased because the student turning in the work did it themselves, I know the work is theirs and it reflects what they have learned.  You are required to keep all work that is returned to you in a three ring binder I will check these once each quarter and they will be worth 10% of your total grade.    

 

Following are the four categories and their weighting; homework 20%, notebooks 10%, quizzes & labs 20%, and unit exams 50%.


 

 

CALCULATING YOUR GRADES

 

Your total grade consists of four parts with the following weightings.

 

Homework: 20% of grade

Quizzes and labs: 20%

Notebook: 10%

Tests: 50 %

 

This may sound somewhat confusing, but here is how you calculate your total grade.

 

Take the points earned in each category divided by the total points possible in each category, multiply that by the weightings and add all these answers together for your grade.  I know you are still confused so here are some examples.

 

Homework: total points earned = 455

                   total points possible = 500

 

Quizzes: total points earned = 27

               total points possible = 30

 

Notebook: total points earned = 10

                 total points possible = 10

 

Tests: total points earned = 95

           total points possible = 100

 

Homework: 455/500 = .91             .91 X 20% =   .182

Quizzes :     27/30     = .90             .90 X 20% =   .18

Notebook:   10/10     = 1.00           1.0 X 10% =   .10

Tests:          95/100 = .95               .95 X 50% =   .475 

 

Total grade                                                          .937  or 93.7% which is an A

 

Now remember that if you are caught cheating on a test you will receive a zero on that test.  Let’s see how that may affect your grade.  I will use the same numbers except for the test.

 

Homework: 455/500 = .91             .91 X 20% =   .182

Quizzes :     27/30     = .90             .90 X 20% =   .18

Notebook:   10/10     = 1.00           1.0 X 10% =   .10

Tests:          0/100     = 0.0              0.0 X 50% =  0.0

 

Total grade                                                  .462  or 46.2% which is an F

 

Not only is it an F it is a very low F.  The only way to bring that grade up is to do well on the next test.  Since we have tests only every 2-3 weeks you would be ineligible for any activities for at least that amount of time.  So if you are thinking about cheating be aware of the consequences and don’t expect any sympathy if you are caught.