Physical Science Syllabus

PHYSICAL SCIENCE

 

 

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Course Description:

         

         Throughout the school year we will explore the basic fundamentals of Physics and Chemistry as required by the State Standards.  We will investigate the different forces that affect our daily lives, the chemical and physical properties of matter, and waves of different forms.  

 

Classroom Expectations:

1.     Bring your textbook, blue or black pen, pencil with eraser, and paper to class each day.

2.     Students will be required to have a three ring binder to save and organize all       papers that are returned by Mr. Ohlde.

3.     Be inside the classroom before the tardy bell rings.

4.     Do not disrupt the class in any way.

5.     Turn in homework the day that it is due. 

6.     Follow lab instructions and use lab safety procedures as needed.

7.     Take care of lab equipment and keep lab area neat and clean.

8.     Respect others and their things.

9.     DO NOT USE CELL PHONES IN CLASS, THE SCHOOL POLICY CONCERNING CELL PHONES WILL BE STRICTLY ENFORCED IN THIS CLASS.  IF A PHONE IS BEING USED FOR ANY PURPOSE IT WILL BE TURNED IN TO THE PRINCIPAL.

10. Anyone caught cheating on a quiz or test will receive a zero.  Just so everyone understands what I think constitutes cheating I will give several examples.  Using notes of any kind is cheating.  This includes information saved in the memory of calculators, written on paper, or on the tables; I will check for these.  Looking at another student’s paper is cheating, likewise carelessly or intentionally letting someone look at your paper is cheating.  If a student isn’t present when a test or quiz is given and needs to make it up at a later date it is cheating for any student to discuss items that are on the test with that student.  Talking between students during a test will be considered cheating.  If a situation arises that is not stated above Mr. Ohlde along with the school’s administrator will decide if it is cheating.

Grading:

          We use a variety of means to evaluate student understanding.  Listed below are the items that will make up a students final grade.

 

                    50% Tests

                    20% Homework

20% Quizzes, Lab Activities, In-Class Assignments and

                            Unit Projects

                    10%  Notebooks

 

Scale: 

90-100 = A

80- 89  = B

70- 79  = C

60- 69  = D

Below 60= F

 

If a student’s grade is low, he or she needs to be responsible to see me for extra help.

 

If you have any questions or concerns feel free to contact me at school by phone or by e-mail:  rohlde@usd223.org


 

Course Work:

Tests: Will be given at the end of each chapter covered, usually   

           every 2-3 weeks.

Quizzes: Will be given occasionally to determine level of student understanding.

Homework: 3-4 nights a week, either reading or written work

          Notebooks will be checked at the end of each quarter. 

 

The information covered in each chapter is given below.  The objective for every chapter is that students learn and understand this information.

 

Chapter 1:

Methods of science

          Science categories:

Life, earth and space, and physical science

Scientific method:

State problem, gather information, form a hypothesis,                           test hypothesis, analyze data, form a conclusion. dependent and independent variables, constants and controls, bias, theories vs. laws

                   Standards of measurement:

                             Precision and accuracy

                             SI units and prefixes and conversion of units

                             Measuring distance, volume, mass, time and temperature

                   Graphs: a visual display of data.

                             Line graphs used for trends

                             Bar graphs used for counting

                             Circle graphs used for parts of a whole

 

Chapter 2:           

          Science, Technology, and Society

                   Scientific discoveries:

                             Disease prevention

                             Weather forecasting

                   Types of technology:    

                             Objects

                             Methods or techniques

                             Knowledge or skills

                             Systems

                   Needs of developing countries vs. industrialized countries

                   Bioengineering and food

                   Societal forces shape technology:

                             Consumer wants and needs, personal values

Economic forces: federal government, private foundations, and private industries

                   Responsible technology: environmental issues

                   Technology development process:

Scientist and engineers, problem identification, propose solutions, constraints, testing, laws and regulations, prototypes and control systems

                   Intellectual properties: patents, copyrights, and trademarks  

         

 

Chapter 3:

          Motion, Acceleration, and Forces

                   Motion:

Position, relative motion, distance vs. displacement, instantaneous and average speed, velocity vs. speed, distance-time graphs

                   Acceleration:

Change in speed or direction, calculation of acceleration, speed-time graphs, positive and negative acceleration

                   Motion and forces:

Force is a push or a pull: net forces, balanced and unbalanced forces

Friction: Static vs. sliding forces, microwelds, air resistance and terminal velocity

 

Chapter 4:

          Laws of Motion

                   Newton’s 1st law:

Inertia and mass

                   Newton’s 2nd law:

Relationship of force, mass, and acceleration

                   Gravity:

Universal law of gravity, gravitational acceleration, weight vs. mass, free fall

                   Projectile motion:

                             Independence of horizontal and vertical motion

                   Centripetal force

                   Newton’s 3rd law:

                             Action-reaction forces, rocket propulsion

                   Law of conservation of momentum


 

Chapter 5:

          Energy

                   Kinetic energy

                   Potential energy: elastic, chemical, and gravitational

                   Conservation of energy:

Transformation of energy from one form to another, PE to KE and back to PE, friction and energy conservation, nuclear fission,

 

Chapter 6

          Work and Machines

                   Force and the direction of motion, calculating work,

                   Power: the rate at which work is done

Machines: increase force, change direction, input and output forces, ideal     

machines, ideal mechanical advantage, efficiency,

Simple machines: levers (1st, 2nd and 3rd class), pulleys, block and tackle, wheel     and axle, inclined planes, screws, and wedges

 

Chapter 7

          Earth –Moon- Sun System

                   Earth’s size and shape according to ancient measurements

                   Earth’s magnetic fields

                   Earth’s orbit

          Time and seasons

                   Earth’s movements measure time

                   The reason for the seasons

                   Equinoxes and solstices

          Earth’s moon

                   Rotation and revolution

                   Tides

                   Moon phases, waxing and waning

                   Solar and lunar eclipses

                   The moon’s surface and interior

                   Exploration of the moon and its origin


 

Chapter 8

          The Solar System

                   Planet motion

                   Geocentric model vs. heliocentric model

                   Classification of planets

                   Origin of solar system

          The inner planets

                   Mercury, Venus, Earth, and Mars

                   Exploration of inner planets

          The outer planets

                   Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, Pluto (no longer classified as a planet)

                   Comets, asteroids and meteoroids

         

Life in the solar system

                   Extraterrestrial life on Mars, Europa, and Titan

 

Chapter 18

          Classification of Matter

                   Pure substances: elements, compounds molecules

                   Mixtures: heterogeneous, homogeneous, colloids, and suspensions

          Physical properties

                   Appearance and behavior, separation by physical properties

          Physical changes, distillation

          Chemical properties and changes

Evidence of chemical change: color change, gas production, temperature change, odor, and solid formation                          

          Law of conservation of mass

 

Chapter 19

          Structure of the Atom

                   Nucleus, protons, neutrons, electrons and quarks

                   The changing atomic model and the electron cloud model

          Masses of atoms

                   Atomic number, mass number and isotopes

          The periodic table

                   Organizing elements, Mendeleev’s periodic table and predictions

Groups or families in columns, electron cloud structure and energy levels similar properties

          Regions on the periodic table, metals, nonmetals and metalloids

 

 

Chapter 22

          Chemical Bonds

Stability in bonding: compounds, formulas, atomic stability, chemical stability

          Types of bonds

                   Ionic bonds, covalent bonds, polar covalent bonds

          Compound formulas and names (ionic)

                   Binary compounds, oxidation numbers and the periodic table,

                   Writing formulas and naming compounds

                   Polyatomic ions: names and formulas

                   Hydrates

          Naming covalent compounds

 

Chapter 23

          Chemical Reactions

                   Chemical reactions: reactants and products

                   Lavosier: Law of conservation of mass, nomenclature

          Chemical equations

                   Balancing equations and coefficients

          Classification of reactions

Combustion, synthesis, decomposition, single displacement, double displacement and oxidation-reduction reaction

          Chemical reactions and energy

Conservation of energy, activation energy, endothermic and exothermic reaction

          Catalyst and inhibitors

 

Chapter 10

          The Nature of Waves

                   Waves, energy and matter

                   Mechanical waves: transverse and compressional waves

                   Sound, water, and seismic waves

Wave properties: crests, troughs, rarefactions, wavelengths, frequency and period

                   Behavior of waves: reflection, echoes, refraction, and diffraction

                   Interference: constructive, destructive, standing waves and resonance


Chapter 16

          Energy sources

                   Fossil fuels: petroleum, coal, natural gas and their origins

                   Generating electricity and the efficiency of power plants

Nuclear energy: nuclear reactors, nuclear fission, controlling the reactions

Nuclear power plants, their risks, and disposal of waste, high and low level waste

Renewable energy sources: Photovoltaic cells, solar energy, hydroelectricity, tidal, wind, and geothermal energy

 


Following are the assignments for each chapter, also listed are the state standards addressed in that chapter.  Wks stands for worksheets from the chapter resource manual.  Substitutions, additions, or deletions may be made to the listed assignments and activities to better meet the needs and abilities of the students.  Time constraints along with school activities and student attendance may also require some adjustments.

ASSIGNMENTS CHAPTER 1

THE NATURE OF SCIENCE

APPOXIMATELY 2 WEEKS

STANDARDS

Section 1 review and discussion

 

Section 2 review and discussion

 

Wks pages 19,20,30,31

 

Section 3 review and discussion

 

Wks pages 21 & 32

 

Chapter 1 review 1-26 not 23

 

Wks pages22,29,37,38

 

Vertical / horizontal projectile demonstration

 

Wks pages 27,28,33,34

 

Chapter 1 test

1.1.1

actively engages in asking and evaluating research questions

1.1.2

actively engages in investigations, including developing questions, gathering and analyzing data, and designing and conducting research

1.1.3

actively engages in using technological tools and
mathematics in their own scientific investigations

1.1.4

actively engages in conducting an inquiry, formulating and revising his or her scientific explanations and models (physical, conceptual, or mathematical) using logic and evidence, and recognizing that potential alternative
explanations and models should be considered.

1.1.5

actively engages in communicating and defending the design, results, and conclusion of his/her investigation

7.1.2

explains how science uses peer review, replication of methods, and norms of honesty

7.2.1

understands scientific knowledge describes and explains the physical world in terms of matter, energy, and forces. Scientific knowledge is provisional and is subject to change as new evidence becomes available

7.2.2

understands scientific knowledge begins with empirical observations, which are the data (also called facts or evidence) upon which further scientific knowledge is built.

7.2.3

understands scientific knowledge consists of
hypotheses, inferences, laws, and theories

7.2.4

understands a testable hypothesis or inference must be subject to confirmation by empirical evidence

 

 

ASSIGNMENTS CHAPTER 2

SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY, AND SOCIETY

APPROXIMATELY 3 WEEKS

STANDARDS

Section 1 review

 

Wks pages 16,23,26

 

Section 2 review

 

Paper clip project

 

Wks pages 15,24,27

 

Crimping machine design

 

Wks pages 25 & 28

 

Chapter 2 review

 

Wks pages 17,18,29,30,33,34

 

Chapter 2 test

5.1.1

understands technology is the application of
scientific knowledge for functional purposes

5.1.2

understands creativity, imagination, and a broad scientific knowledge base are required to produce useful results

5.1.3

understands science advances new technologies.
New technologies open new areas for scientific inquiry

6.4.2

understands there is a need to assess potential risk
and danger from natural and human-induced hazards

6.5.1

understands progress in science and technology can be affected by social issues and challenges. Science and technology indicate what can happen, not what should happen

7.1.5

understands there are many issues which involve morals, ethics, values or spiritual beliefs that go beyond what science can explain, but for which solid scientific literacy is useful

7.1.6

recognizes society’s role in supporting topics of research and determining institutions where research is conducted

 

 


 

ASSIGNMENTS CHAPTER 3

MOTION, ACCELERATION, AND FORCES

APPROXIMATELY 3 WEEKS

STANDARDS

Section 1 review

 

Section 2 review

 

Wks pages 19,20,27,30

 

Wks pages 28,31

 

Section 3 review

 

Wks pages 21,22,29

 

Wks pages 33,35,37

 

Model car lab: position/time/velocity/graph

 

Chapter 3 review

 

Chapter 3 test

 

2B.1.1

understands Newton’s Laws and the variables of time, position, velocity, and acceleration can be used to describe the position and motion of particles

2B.1.2

understands physicists use conservation laws to
analyze the motion of objects.

 

 

 


 

ASSIGNMENTS CHAPTER 4

THE LAWS OF MOTION

APPROXIMATELY 2-3 WEEKS

STANDARDS

Section 1&2 review

 

Wks pages 27 & 30

 

Section 3 review

 

Wks pages 28 & 31

 

Chapter 4 review

 

Wks pages 29 & 32

 

Vertical acceleration demonstration

 

Wks pages 19-22

 

Tug of war

 

Wks pages 33,34,37,38

 

Chapter 4 test

2B.1.1

understands Newton’s Laws and the variables of time, position, velocity, and acceleration can be used to describe the position and motion of particles

2B1.2

understands physicists use conservation laws to
analyze the motion of objects.

2B.3.1

There are four fundamental forces in nature: strong nuclear force, weak nuclear force, electromagnetic force, and gravitational force

 

 

 

ASSIGNMENTS CHAPTER 5

ENERGY

APPROXIMATELY 2 WEEKS

STANDARDS

Section 1 review

 

Section 2 review

 

Wks pages 19,21,28,30-32

 

Potential energy lab

 

Chapter 5 review

 

Chapter 5 test

 

2A.2.1

understands chemists use kinetic and potential energy to explain the physical and chemical properties of matter on earth that may exist in any of these three states: solids, liquids, and gases

 

ASSIGNMENTS CHAPTER 6

WORK AND MACHINES

APPROXIMATELY 2 WEEKS

STANDARDS

Section 1 review

 

Wks pages 29,32

 

Section 2 review

 

Wks pages 22,30,33

 

Section 3 review

 

Wks pages 21,23,31,34,39,42

 

Simple machine lab (levers, block & tackles, inclined planes)

 

Chapter 6 review

 

Chapter 6 test

5.1.1

understands technology is the application of
scientific knowledge for functional purposes

5.1.2

understands creativity, imagination, and a broad scientific knowledge base are required to produce useful results

 

 

 

ASSIGNMENTS CHAPTER 7

THE EARTH-MOON-SUN SYSTEM

APPROXIMATELY 2 WEEKS

STANDARDS

Section 1 review

 

Section 2 review

 

Wks pages 19-22,37,38

 

Section 3 review

 

Wks 27-30, 33-36

 

Chapter 7 test

 

Notebook check

4.3.1

understands gravitational attraction of objects in the
solar system keeps solar system objects in orbit

4.3.2

understands the relationship between the earth,
moon, and sun explains the seasons, tides and moon phases

4.3.3

understands the relative sizes and distances of
objects in the solar system.

4.3.4

understands the sun, earth, and other objects in the solar system formed from a nebular cloud of dust
and gas.

 

 

 

 

ASSIGNMENTS CHAPTER 8

THE SOLAR SYSTEM

APPROXIMATELY 2 WEEKS

STANDARDS

Section 1 review

 

Section 2 review

 

Wks pages 19-22

 

Section 3 review

 

Section 4 review

 

Wks pages 27-32,39,40

 

Chapter 8 review

 

Chapter 8 test

4.3.1

understands gravitational attraction of objects in the
solar system keeps solar system objects in orbit

4.3.3

understands the relative sizes and distances of
objects in the solar system.

4.3.4

understands the sun, earth, and other objects in the solar system formed from a nebular cloud of dust
and gas.

 

 

 

ASSIGNMENTS CHAPTER 9

HEAT AND THE STATES OF MATTER

APPROXIMATELY 2 WEEKS

STANDARDS

Section 1 review

 

Section 2 review

 

Section 3 review

 

Section 4 review

 

Energy transformation activity

 

Wks 19-22, 22,27,28

 

Chapter 9 review

 

Chapter 9 test

 

2A.2.1

understands chemists use kinetic and potential energy to explain the physical and chemical properties of matter on earth that may exist in any of these three states: solids, liquids, and gases

2B.2.2

understands the first law of thermodynamics states the total internal energy of a substance (the sum of all the kinetic and potential energies of its constituent molecules) will change only if heat is exchanged with the environment or work is done on or by the substance. In any physical interaction, the total energy in the universe is conserved.

2B.2.3

understands the second law of thermodynamics that states the entropy of the universe is increasing.

 

 

 

 

 

ASSIGNMENTS CHAPTER 18

CLASSIFICATION OF MATTER

APPROXIMATELY 2 WEEKS

STANDARDS

Section 1&2 review

 

Wks 19,20,27,28

 

Wks 21,22,28,30,31,32

 

Classification of pure substance, homogenous mixture, and heterogenous mixture activity

 

Chapter review

 

Mixture separation lab

 

Chapter 18 test

2A.1.1

understands atoms, the fundamental organizational unit of matter, are composed of subatomic particles.
Chemists are primarily interested in the protons, electrons, and neutrons found in the atom.

 

 

 

ASSIGNMENTS CHAPTER 19

PROPERTIES OF ATOMS AND THE PERIODIC TABLE

APPROXIMATELY 2 WEEKS

STANDARDS

Section 1 review

 

Section 2 review

 

Isotope quiz

 

Section 3 review

 

Wks 27-30,33,34,37,38

 

Elemental properties graphs

 

Chapter review

 

Chapter 19 test

 

2A.1.1

understands atoms, the fundamental organizational unit of matter, are composed of subatomic particles.
Chemists are primarily interested in the protons, electrons, and neutrons found in the atom.

2A.1.2

understands isotopes are atoms with the same atomic number (same number of protons) but different numbers of neutrons. The nuclei of some atoms are radioactive isotopes that spontaneously decay, releasing radioactive energy.

2A.2.2

understands the periodic table lists elements according to increasing atomic number. This table organizes physical and chemical trends by groups, periods, and sub-categories

 

 


ASSIGNMENTS CHAPTER 22

CHEMICAL BONDS

APPROXIMATELY 2-3 WEEKS

STANDARDS

Section 1 review

 

Wks 27-34,37,38

 

Section 2 review

 

Wks 19-22

 

Section 3 review

 

Chap 22 review

 

Chapter 22 test

 

2A.2.3

understands chemical bonds result when valence electrons are transferred or shared between atoms. Breaking a chemical bond requires energy. Formation of a chemical bond releases energy. Ionic compounds result from atoms transferring electrons. Molecular compounds result from atoms sharing electrons. For example, carbon atoms can bond to each other in chains, rings, and branching networks. Branched network and metallic solids also result from bonding.

 

 

ASSIGNMENTS CHAPTER 23

CHEMICAL REACTIONS

APPROXIMATELY 3 WEEKS

STANDARDS

Section 1 review

 

Section 2 review

 

Wks 19,20,27,28

 

Section 3 review

 

Section 4 review

 

Chem chips activity

 

Wks 21,22,29,30,35,36

 

Chapter 23 review

 

Chapter 23 test

2A.2.3

understands chemical bonds result when valence electrons are transferred or shared between atoms. Breaking a chemical bond requires energy. Formation of a chemical bond releases energy. Ionic compounds result from atoms transferring electrons. Molecular compounds result from atoms sharing electrons. For example, carbon atoms can bond to each other in chains, rings, and branching networks. Branched network and metallic solids also result from bonding.

2A.3.1

understands a chemical reaction occurs when one or more substances (reactants) react to form a different chemical substance(s) (products). There are different types of chemical reactions all of which demonstrate the Law of Conservation of Matter and Energy.

2A.3.2

understands how to perform mathematical calculations regarding the Law of Conservation of Matter, i.e., through stoichiometric relationships

 

 


 

ASSIGNMENTS CHAPTER 10

WAVES

APPROXIMATELY 3 WEEKS

STANDARDS

Section 1 review

 

Section 2 review

 

Wks 27,28,31,32

 

Section 3 review

 

Transverse / compression wave activity

 

Wks 19-22,29,30

 

Chapter review

 

Chapter 10 test

2B.3.2

understands waves have energy and can transfer
energy when they interact with matter

2B.3.3

The student understand interference – how waves
interact with other waves.

2B.3.4

The student will understand the principles of
reflection and refraction

2B.3.5

understands electromagnetic waves result when a
charged particle is accelerated or decelerated

 

 

ASSIGNMENTS CHAPTER 16

ENERGY SOURCES

APPROXIMATELY 2-3 WEEKS

STANDARDS

Section 1 review

 

Section 2 review

 

Wks 37 & 38

 

Section 3 review

 

Solar cell / radiometer / potato clock demonstration

 

Wks 19,20,27,28,30,31

 

Chapter review

 

Chapter 16 test

 

 

2B.2.1

understands matter has energy. Mass and energy can be interchanged. The total energy in the universe is constant, but the type of energy may vary.

2B.2.2

understands the first law of thermodynamics states the total internal energy of a substance (the sum of all the kinetic and potential energies of its constituent molecules) will change only if heat is exchanged with the environment or work is done on or by the substance. In any physical interaction, the total energy in the universe is conserved.

5.1.3

understands science advances new technologies.
New technologies open new areas for scientific inquiry

6.3.2

understands earth does not have infinite resources

6.5.1

understands progress in science and technology can be affected by social issues and challenges. Science and technology indicate what can happen, not what should happen

 

ASSIGNMENTS CHAPTER 21

EARTH’S CHANGING SURFACE

APPROXIMATELY 2 WEEKS

(IF TIME ALLOWS)

STANDARDS

Section 1 review

 

Section 2 review

 

Section 3 review

 

Wks 26,27

 

Energy sources quiz

 

Wks 27,33,34

4.1.1

understands constructive and destructive processes, including weathering, erosion and deposition, dynamically reshape the surface of the earth

4.1.4

Understands the processes of water cycling through surface water (oceans, lakes, streams, glaciers),
ground water (aquifers), and the atmosphere. (hydrological cycle)

4.2.1

understands geological time is used to understand
the earth’s past.

 

 

 


Mr. Ohlde’s Classroom Rules and Regulations

 

1.      Any homework, quiz, or test that is to be handed in should not be written in red, orange, or pink ink, any fringes from spiral bound notebooks need to be removed.

 

2.      The following information should be in the top right hand corner.

Name______________________

Date due____________________

Page no.____________________

 

3.      Use proper grammar and complete sentences on all written assignments.  Points will    be deducted if this rule is not followed.

 

4.      All students are expected to contribute in group projects and assignments, I will be watching for this.  If someone isn't doing his or her part please speak with me.

 

5.      Bring your text, notebook, calculator, paper, and pencil to every class.  If this becomes a problem you may start losing points.

 

6.      Don’t touch or mess with any material or equipment until I instruct you to.  During lab exercises we will sometimes be using materials that can cause permanent personal injury; horseplay or fooling around will not be tolerated.

 

7.      I know accidents happen, but if you break equipment due to carelessness you may be required to pay for replacing it.

 

8.      I am not a big fan of extra credit, if you want and need extra credit you will need to do extra work.  Extra credit will be something above and beyond the work we are doing in class, not just an extra worksheet or two.  Keep track of your scores so that you are aware of your present grade; ask me if you have any questions about how to calculate your grade.  By keeping track of your grade you can react early if it is lower than you like. 

9.   Anyone caught cheating on a quiz or test will receive a zero.  Just so everyone understands what I think constitutes cheating I will give several examples.  Using notes of any kind is cheating.  This includes information saved in the memory of calculators, written on paper, or on the tables; I will check for these.  Looking at another student’s paper is cheating, likewise carelessly or intentionally letting someone look at your paper is cheating.  If a student isn’t present when a test or quiz is given and needs to make it up at a later date it is cheating for any student to discuss items that are on the test with that student.  Talking between students during a test will be considered cheating.  If a situation arises that is not stated above Mr. Ohlde along with the school’s administrator will decide if it is cheating.

 

10.  Do not use cell phones in class, the school policy concerning cell phones will be         enforced in this class.  If a phone is being used for any purpose it will be turned in to the principal.

 

 

 

 

Late papers:

 

While I understand there will be times when turning in a late paper is unavoidable you need to understand the importance of turning in assignments in a timely manner.  Each student will be allowed three late papers without penalty, after that no credit will be given.  If you are going to be gone for a planned activity (school function, family outings, or hunting etc.) you are expected to turn in your homework before leaving.

 

 

 


Grading and Weighting:

 

Your grades will be divided into four categories, homework, quizzes, notebooks, and tests.  Since it is not unusual for students to work together on homework it is difficult to determine if the student turning in the homework completed and understands the homework.  I have no problem with students working together as long as one is not simply copying another student’s work.  For this reason the value of the score is reduced.  The value given for tests and quizzes is increased because the student turning in the work did it themselves, I know the work is theirs and it reflects what they have learned.  You are required to keep all work that is returned to you in a three ring binder I will check these once each quarter and they will be worth 10% of your total grade.    

 

Following are the four categories and their weighting; homework 20%, notebooks 10%, quizzes & labs 20%, and unit exams 50%.


 

 

CALCULATING YOUR GRADES

 

Your total grade consists of four parts with the following weightings.

 

Homework: 20% of grade

Quizzes and labs: 20%

Notebook: 10%

Tests: 50 %

 

This may sound somewhat confusing, but here is how you calculate your total grade.

 

Take the points earned in each category divided by the total points possible in each category, multiply that by the weightings and add all these answers together for your grade.  I know you are still confused so here are some examples.

 

Homework: total points earned = 455

                   total points possible = 500

 

Quizzes: total points earned = 27

               total points possible = 30

 

Notebook: total points earned = 10

                 total points possible = 10

 

Tests: total points earned = 95

           total points possible = 100

 

Homework: 455/500 = .91             .91 X 20% =   .182

Quizzes :     27/30     = .90             .90 X 20% =   .18

Notebook:   10/10     = 1.00           1.0 X 10% =   .10

Tests:          95/100 = .95               .95 X 50% =   .475 

 

Total grade                                                          .937  or 93.7% which is an A

 

Now remember that if you are caught cheating on a test you will receive a zero on that test.  Let’s see how that may affect your grade.  I will use the same numbers except for the test.

 

 

Homework: 455/500 = .91             .91 X 20% =   .182

Quizzes :     27/30     = .90             .90 X 20% =   .18

Notebook:   10/10     = 1.00           1.0 X 10% =   .10

Tests:          0/100     = 0.0              0.0 X 50% =  0.0

 

Total grade                                                          .462  or 46.2% which is an F

 

Not only is it an F it is a very low F.  The only way to bring that grade up is to do well on the next test.  Since we have tests only every 2-3 weeks you would be ineligible for any activities for at least that amount of time.  So if you are thinking about cheating be aware of the consequences and don’t expect any sympathy if you are caught.