Course Descriptions and Objectives

English II

 Course Description:

        In this class students read and study the following genres of literature:  short stories, drama, essays, poetry, and novels (fiction and non-fiction).  Utilizing their anthologies, students examine the story elements and literary terms such as plot, point of view, conflict, foreshadowing, flashback, etc., while reading a collection of short stories.  Furthermore, each piece of literature incorporates worksheets reviewing grammar and usage, analyzing the literature selection, and reinforcing vocabulary.  (Additionally, students strengthen their vocabulary with worksheets and tests throughout the entire course.)  The two major reading assignments are the Shakespearean play Julius Caesar and the novel The Lord of the Flies.  Both of which incorporate learning activities throughout. If time permits, the class studies an additional Shakespearean play or the novel A Separate Peace. Students are also expected to read Accelerated Reader books each nine-week period and pass the computer tests over the novels to accumulate the required book points. 

Throughout the year, students continue to study writing conventions and grammar while utilizing their Elements of Writing textbooks.  Students write a variety of essays:  comparison/contrast, descriptive, narrative, technical, expository, and persuasive.  Other forms of writing are also incorporated.  Writing is developed and assessed using the 6-trait analytic writing model. The main writing project is an end-of-the-year paper focusing on the topic “How I Have Changed as a Sophomore.”  Research for this paper comes from the students’ class journals, which are maintained daily.

Course Objectives:

  • To incorporate new organizational and study skills
  • To develop research abilities and encourage library utilization
  • To foster an appreciation and desire for lifelong learning
  • To utilize knowledge already possessed by the student and classmates in order to further the leaning experience
  • To develop interpersonal and interpersonal skills through cooperative learning
  • To expose students to a wide variety of fictional and non-fictional narrative, expository, persuasive, descriptive, and technical writing
  • To introduce various authors
  • To develop literary analytical skills
  • To develop strong written and verbal communication skills
  • To improve students’ understanding and usage of the English language through intensive grammatical instruction
  • To increase vocabulary knowledge and retention through various techniques
  • To move toward mastery of the 6-trait writing components
  • To move toward the standard of excellence in the reading and writing state standards

English III

Course Description:

        In this class, students study American literature (poems, plays, short stories, novels, journals, movies, news articles, technical pieces, etc.) to achieve state and district reading standards.  Students examine the story elements and literary terms such as plot, point of view, conflict, foreshadowing, flashback, etc., during their reading. Furthermore, each piece of assigned literature incorporates worksheets reviewing grammar and usage, analyzing literature, and reinforcing vocabulary. (Additionally, students strengthen their vocabulary with worksheets and tests throughout the entire course.)  The major reading assignment during the year is the novel The Crucible or the novel Of Mice and Men, which incorporates learning activities throughout.  If time permits, the class studies the novel The Scarlet Letter or reads the Shakespearean play Hamlet.  Students are also expected to read Accelerated Reader books each nine-week period and pass the computer tests over the novels to accumulate the required book points. 

Throughout the year, students continue to study writing conventions and grammar while utilizing their Elements of Writing textbooks to achieve the state and district writing standards and to prepare for the ACT.  Students write essays and complete persuasive, expository, narrative, descriptive, and technical writing.  Other forms of writing are also incorporated, and students write daily in their class journals.  Writing is developed and assessed using the 6-trait writing analytical model.  The main writing projects during the year are the research paper written during the “Career Research Project and Presentation” unit and the State Writing Assessment.

Course Objectives:

  • To incorporate new organizational and study skills
  • To develop research abilities and encourage library utilization
  • To foster an appreciation and desire for lifelong learning
  • To utilize knowledge already possessed by the student and classmates in order to further the leaning experience
  • To develop interpersonal and interpersonal skills through cooperative learning
  • To expose students to a wide variety of fictional and non-fictional narrative, expository, persuasive, descriptive, and technical writing
  • To introduce various authors
  • To develop literary analytical skills
  • To develop strong written and verbal communication skills
  • To improve students’ understanding and usage of the English language through intensive grammatical instruction
  • To increase vocabulary knowledge and retention through various techniques
  • To move toward mastery of the 6-trait writing components
  • To move toward the standard of excellence in the reading and writing state standards

English IV

Course Description:

        English IV begins with a review of the writing process and the types of writing:  descriptive, expository, persuasive, narrative, and technical.  Following the writing review, students construct a formal research paper (according to MLA guidelines) including bibliography, source cards, note cards, outlines, etc.  Other forms of writing are also completed during the year (such as contest, scholarship, and college entrance essays) and students are expected to write daily in their class journals.  Throughout the year, students continue to study writing conventions and grammar while utilizing their Elements of Writing textbooks.  All writing is developed and assessed using the 6-trait analytic writing model.

Students use their literature anthologies to examine British/English literature.  Students examine story elements and literary terms such as plot, point of view, conflict, foreshadowing, flashback, etc., during their reading. Furthermore, each piece of chosen literature incorporates worksheets reviewing grammar and usage, analyzing literature, and reinforcing vocabulary.  (Additionally, students strengthen their vocabulary with worksheets and tests throughout the entire course.)  The major reading assignment is the Shakespearean play Macbeth, which incorporates learning activities throughout.  If time permits, the class studies a novel such as Animal Farm or reads/views another Shakespearean play.  Students are also expected to read Accelerated Reader books each nine-week period and pass the computer tests covering the novels to accumulate the required book points.

Course Objectives:

  • To incorporate new organizational and study skills
  • To develop research abilities and encourage library utilization
  • To foster an appreciation and desire for lifelong learning
  • To utilize knowledge already possessed by the student and classmates in order to further the leaning experience
  • To develop interpersonal and interpersonal skills through cooperative learning
  • To expose students to a wide variety of fictional and non-fictional narrative, expository, persuasive, descriptive, and technical writing
  • To introduce various authors
  • To develop literary analytical skills
  • To develop strong written and verbal communication skills
  • To improve students’ understanding and usage of the English language through intensive grammatical instruction
  • To increase vocabulary knowledge and retention through various techniques
  • To move toward mastery of the 6-trait writing components
  • To move toward the standard of excellence in the reading and writing state standards

Freshman Speech

 Course Description:

            This class is an introductory course in oral communications.  Before beginning speeches and presentations, students examine the communication theory, interpersonal communication, voice production, and listening skills.  Nevertheless, the main focus of the class is public speaking and presentations.  Students learn how to construct, organize, deliver, and critique the three main types of speeches:  the informative speech, the demonstration speech, and the persuasive speech.  During the development of these speeches, students learn how to formulate outlines, utilize library resources, and employ visual aids.  Since speech class is a performance-based course, students apply and demonstrate their learned skills in a variety of speaking activities beyond speeches including oral interpretation, drama, and storytelling.